Benzodiazepines Facts

Benzodiazepines, or “Benzos,” are a class of Pharmaceutical Drugs prescribed for a spectrum of mental disorders and ailments. They are used to treat moderate to severe anxiety, panic attacks, epileptic seizures and even withdrawal symptoms from other central nervous system depressants like alcohol.

Most Benzodiazepines come in pill or tablet form for oral consumption. Some brands, like Valium, can also be administered intravenously as a clear, odorless liquid.

Benzodiazepines are legal when they are prescribed. However, a black market for the drugs exists as well. On the street, Benzodiazepine drugs might go by other names like Tranks, Downers or simply Benzos.

Some common Benzodiazepines include:

Benzodiazepines can be dangerous and addictive

BENZODIAZEPINES EFFECTS AND ABUSE

Benzodiazepines bind with special neurons called GABA receptors in a process that slows overactive brain function and relieves severe mental stress. Those abusing Benzodiazepines can experience a euphoric “high” or alcohol-like “buzz,” depending on the brand abused. This is followed by a prolonged sedation.

Any use of Benzodiazepines outside of a doctor’s recommendation constitutes abuse. Some Benzodiazepine users crush and snort their tablets or pills to amplify the potency. This increases the likelihood of overdose. Seizures and Coma are common symptoms of a Benzo overdose.

Benzodiazepine overdose can slow breathing and heart rates until they stop completely, resulting in death.

ADDICTION TO BENZODIAZEPINES

Due to their high potency, Benzodiazepines can change the brain’s neurochemistry. Over time, the drugs build up in the user’s body. Users can develop mental and physical dependencies on the drugs as a result.

The prevalence of Benzodiazepines as popular, oft-prescribed anti-anxiety medications means that people from every demographic and lifestyle can be exposed to them. Addiction can form even under a physician’s care and prescribed doses.

Because Benzodiazepines are available by prescription, users and their loved ones are often unaware of the high abusive and addictive potential they hold. Signs of addiction that might be overlooked include developing a tolerance to the drugs’ sedative effects or dismissing important people and activities to focus solely on getting and abusing the drugs.


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